Curious Appetite

Florence

How to spot non-touristy restaurants in Florence, Italy

I’m going to say somethings you might not like but when you ask for “non-touristy” restaurants in Florence in an attempt to avoid tourist-traps and to eat where the locals are- do you actually mean that? Also, what is wrong with being a tourist that is literally what you are. 

You do realize you are the very tourist asking where to eat without tourists like yourself? Let’s do some gentle google’ing and put some stats into perspective: Florence has about 350K registered residents and attracts around 10 million visitors per year while measuring about 40 square miles (that’s smaller than San Francisco, to give you scale). The historical center of Florence (where the boogie man tourists tend to congregate) covers roughly about 2 square miles. So knowing this- why do you think you’re so exceptional that you deserve to be the only tourist at a restaurant in a city the size of the national mall that contains millions of others just like you in it? Continue Reading

A Curated Guide to Restaurants & Food in Florence, Italy

Pici con le briciole

If you’re getting overwhelmed by all the listicles on my blog, bookmark and study this page dedicated to where to eat in Florence- including street food, coffee shops, gelato joints and links to other guides within the blog or for publications I have contributed to such as Eater, Vogue and The Guardian. Follow my instagram page for daily doses of Florence’s best food & drink finds, restaurant suggestions, as well as travels around Italy. 

(please note this page was first published in 2017 and is regularly reviewed & updated, last review was January 2024. If there is something missing, please contact me)

These are my personal picks for the worthiest restaurants in Florence respected by locals, tastemakers and run by passionate chefs/cooks/staff dedicated to serving and showcasing consistently delicious, quality food in Florence. Continue Reading

Where to eat in Florence during Christmas & New Year’s (2023)

photo credit: Silvio Palladino
photo credit: Silvio Palladino

Are you looking for where to eat in Florence on Christmas and/or New Year’s? Fear not, traveling food lovers! Curious Appetite did all the dirty work of calling around Florence.

If you are interested in small-group culinary tours Christmas Eve & Day, consider our progressive dining crawl! Tickets sell out quick, book your spot asap.

And on New Year’s Eve we will be doing a special Aperitivo Food & Wine Tour in Florence- examples of past events HERE

The pickings for what’s open in Florence on Christmas day are tight & clean including Persian kebab, traditional spots for Florentine fare & steak and pasta & pizza bars. I first compiled this list in 2016 and keep it updated for your dining delight.

PLEASE NOTE: I’ve updated for 2023, but please bear with me in that it might read a little chaotic and not as well organized as I’d like but the tasty intel (i.e. straight up addresses) is there. You’re going to need to look at pics/google reviews for a lot of addresses since I didn’t have time to write out highlights. It’s been a really busy year, thanks for your patience!

I’d be happy to provide a quick hand-picked list if you shoot me an e-mail (I am not very good at responding to DMs on IG) and especially if you show your appreciation by gifting me a coffee on VenMo 😉 Happy Holidays!

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The decline of Florence’s once best restaurants

Favorite Bakeries & Baked Goods in Florence

 

Looking for the most buttery bakeries in Florence?

Buttery may not be the accurate term since many Tuscan baked goods are made with either no butter (i.e. pane toscano, cantuccini biscotti, etc) with olive oil, shortening or plain old fashioned lard (strutto) or a combo of one of these with butter, or modest amounts of butter compared to the French.

But for all intents and purposes, these are the bakeries where you can get the holy trinity of fat carbs and sugar. Italians and Tuscans especially take great pride in baked goods, especially breads which have hundreds of years attached in every crumble and every morsel of that “buttery” simple carbohydrate bite. The French get a lot of credit for patisserie (and rightly so) but what some famously ignore is that they have the eclair thanks to the Renaissance’s original carb loader Caterina de’ Medici and her team of bakers, who introduced the pâte à choux (or bigne’) to these forkless savages (which she also forking corrected). Florence is kind of a big deal.

As a result, it is possible to find yourself in a conundrum of where to find the best baked goods in Florence. Albeit the tiny size. this city is brimming with pastry shops (la pasticceria) bakery shops (il forno) at every corner luring you in with wafts of buttery sweet and savory temptations. Save yourself the hassle with this little guide. Or you can also take a food tour in Florence to taste an array in real life with a professional carb loader. Continue Reading

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