Curious Appetite

Tuscany

Italian Olive Oil supplies are short…now what?

This should be a must read for anyone who eats olive oil and who lives religiously by it, like my mother who bless her funky soul, would even put it in chocolate brownies growing up.

Amid Bugs, Hail, Floods and Bacteria, Italian Olives Take a Beating by The New York Times.

Basically what has happened is that in 2014, olive-growing regions in Italy experienced abundant rainfall coupled with a fruit fly invasion that destroyed most of their crops. The beauty of living in a country so dependent on agriculture, is that we can really feel environmental affects on even the smallest things like household staples. In the states, where everything is available year-round with a relentless global buying power to match, most environmental abnormalities have little consequence on everyday life.  Continue Reading

A Florentine week of eats: countryside, street food and aperitivo

In the last week in Florence, I have been overwhelmed by flavor. Overwhelmed by the beauty of my surroundings. I have decided, being in Seattle for the last several months was nothing but good. Now, I can appreciate my surroundings (and tastes) with a clean slate or yet- a fresh palate. It is good to take breaks from monotony. Think of places which have summer year round due to being near the equator, do you think people there appreciate the beach and sun as say those living in Germany?

Without further rambling, here are some new food findings I have discovered in Florence thus far: Continue Reading

Montepulciano d’Abruzzo vs Vino Nobile/Rosso di Montepulciano

Sangiovese grapes IN Montepulciano, Tuscany. NOT Montepulciano grapes in Abruzzo. Photo from Georgette Jupe when we went on a Montepulciano field trip

I have noticed that a lot of people who travel to Tuscany note that they really like Montepulciano and want to do Montepulciano Wine Tours. Which surprises me because that is a pretty specific wine area and yet when I mention Brunello, they don’t seem to know what that is. Which makes me have a sneaking suspicion that people are thinking of the red wine that is one of the most common table red wines served in Italian restaurants across America: Montepulciano D’Abruzzo. While I hope they are talking about Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, this post is a general explanation of the 2 wines since even when I have been with clients in the Montepulciano wine country, I get this question: Is this wine made with Montepulciano grapes?

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