Curious Appetite

Local/Organic

What’s in Season Fall 2015 (Florence, Italy)

It’s so fun to peruse outdoor markets and I personally love the change of seasons, smelling tasting and exploring the new goodies on the block.

I usually hit up the Sant’Ambrogio market for just about everything. Especially meat from the butchers inside the market and fresh, dirt cheap veggies. It’s also not very touristy thanks to uber-touristy, kitschy Mercato San Lorenzo that keeps Sant’Ambrogio pretty real. I do love San Lorenzo for cheap eats and the foodie oasis within- just not my cup of tea for produce shopping. Although the Sant’Ambrogio market is starting to be inundated with vendors and not farmers, you can still experience a slice of Italian life with a shop through this market. There are some farmers still around (and definitely none at San Lorenzo) and it’s a modest reminder of how Italians live and eat in normal circumstances. Continue Reading

A Quick Guide to Food Markets of Florence

If ever there is a day in which you need a boost in morale, a visit to a food market in Florence is always the anecdote. It is absolutely my favorite food tour to do and I feel my heart flutter any time I walk through these food treasure chests. If you really want to understand the neighborhood culture in Italy there are a few things you should always do when traveling:

1. visit a local coffee bar every morning. Pick one near where you are staying and always go there.

2. hang out at a the closest food market. people watch. observe. Continue Reading

What Foods are in Season Now in Florence (Spring 2015)

It sounds a bit strange to say what’s in season in Florence since produce that comes into Florence comes from farms and gardens around Tuscany. I suspect that one market in Florence may differ from a market in the Maremma in southern Tuscany. And since I am here, for simplicity’s sake- we will stick to Florence.

Why is it useful to know what is in season in Florence? Well, if you are traveling in Florence this may help your dining decisions. I’m a huge fan of “when in Rome” and eating what is traditionally around.

Also- just a few notes. Continue Reading

Culinaria Bistrot: Slow Food Eating in the Oltrarno

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. May I present to you: Culinaria Bistrot:

How can I say delicious any other way?

Want to know what the slow food movement was MEANT to taste like? HERE. Very very dear people own this eatery. People with grit, people with heart. No fuss, no pretension. Reasonable pricing and truly an explosive tasting experience. I went here THREE times in one week. I never do that. Continue Reading

Italian Olive Oil supplies are short…now what?

This should be a must read for anyone who eats olive oil and who lives religiously by it, like my mother who bless her funky soul, would even put it in chocolate brownies growing up.

Amid Bugs, Hail, Floods and Bacteria, Italian Olives Take a Beating by The New York Times.

Basically what has happened is that in 2014, olive-growing regions in Italy experienced abundant rainfall coupled with a fruit fly invasion that destroyed most of their crops. The beauty of living in a country so dependent on agriculture, is that we can really feel environmental affects on even the smallest things like household staples. In the states, where everything is available year-round with a relentless global buying power to match, most environmental abnormalities have little consequence on everyday life.Β  Continue Reading

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